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Print Culture and Publishing
in Southern Africa

Print Cultures South Africa

Partner Profiles

Caroline Davis

Caroline Davis (lead applicant) is Senior Lecturer in the Oxford International Centre for Publishing at Oxford Brookes University, she is responsible for courses in book history and print culture on the MA and BA publishing programmes.  She is currently investigating the work of British publishers in Africa during the 20th century. Her book Creating Postcolonial Literature: African Writers and British Publishers was published by Palgrave in 2013 and she co-edited with David Johnson The Book in Africa: Critical Debates (Palgrave, 2015).

Edited on 13 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Archie Dick

 Archie Dick (co-applicant) is Head of Department and Professor in the Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria. He previously taught at the University of the Western Cape, and the University of South. From 2009 to 2011 he was the Deputy Chairperson of the International Federation of Library Association’s committee of Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression, and he was the Chairperson of the National Council of Library and Information Services (NCLIS) in South Africa from 2012 to 2014. He has been a Visiting Professor at Wayne State University and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Centre for the History of Print and Digital Culture. His most recent book is The Hidden History of South Africa's Book and Reading Cultures (University of Toronto Press, 2013).

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Elizabeth Le Roux

Elizabeth Le Roux is a Senior Lecturer and the coordinator of Publishing Studies in the Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria. She is co-editor of the journal Book History, and her research focuses on the history of books and publishing in South Africa and in Africa more broadly. Her most recent publications include a book, A social history of the university presses in South Africa (Brill, 2015), and a wide variety of articles and chapters. Before becoming a full-time academic, she worked in the scholarly
publishing industry in South Africa.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Other Contributors

Ndabezinhle Luke Dlodlo

Ndabezinhle Luke Dlodlo was educated and worked in Midlands as a Teacher at Amaveni Primary School, Gresham Primary School, Mashoko Mission Primary School and Mokopane Primary School in Ramotswa Botswana [during 1964 to  1974]. He obtained a Bachelor of Science Honours Degree in Government and Politics from Brunel University (UK) in 1979 and joined Longman Zimbabwe as Editor and Publisher in 1979. He obtained a Masters Degree in Public Administration [MPA] from the University of Zimbabwe in 1993 and became MD of Longman Zimbabwe the following Year [1994]. He transferred to South Africa as Regional Director for New Companies Development in 1999 and retired from Longman companies in 2004. While in South Africa, he obtained Distance Learning Doctor of Divinity Degree and was Ordained as a Reverend of the United Christian Fellowship. He joined NUST (National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo) in 2005 as a Lecturer specifically to start a Department of Publishing Studies and a publishing company called NUST Press P/L.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

Zamda R. Geuza

Zamda Geuza teaches communication skills, publishing and editing at the University of Dar es Salaam in the Centre for Communications Studies. She hold a B.A Literature and Language Studies (Hons) from the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and an MSc. in Publishing Studies from Moi University, Kenya. She has worked as an assistant sub editor for The African newspaper, and has worked in several publishing firms, including the New Habari Corporation and at Mkuki na Nyota Publishers Ltd (2012 - 2013), the leading indigenous publishing company, as an English and Swahili editor and a translator. Her research interests include textbook provision, and the textbook vetting and evaluation process in Tanzania, as well scholarly publishing. Currently, she is carrying out research on enhancing children’s readership. Zamda Geuza has coordinated various publishing projects such as The Mwalimu Nyerere Chair in Pan African Studies books, the Children’s Book Project of Tanzania awards, the Muhimbili & JHPIEGO Reproductive Health Project, The United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO] Tanzanian Literation Heritage Project, the Amb. Christopher Liundi Book Project, and the Dr. Ediho Lokanga Project.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

David Johnson

David Johnson is Professor of Literature in the Department of English at The Open University. He is the author of Imagining the Cape Colony (2012) and Shakespeare and South Africa (1996), the principal author of Jurisprudence. A South African Perspective (2001), the co-editor of A Historical Companion to Postcolonial Literatures in English (2005) and co-editor of The Book in Africa: Critical Debates (Palgrave, 2015).

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

Thabiso Mahlape

Thabiso Mahlape holds a Bachelor of Information Science specialising in Publishing from the University of Pretoria. She worked at Jacana Media from 2010 where she honed her skills as publisher with several highly acclaimed bestsellers; Endings & Beginnings by Redi Tlhabi, My Father My Monster by Mcintosh Polela,  Malaika wa Azania’s Memoirs of a Born Free,  Bonnie Henna’s Eyebags & Dimples and Zoleka Mandela’s When Hope Whispers. She is now a partner on Jacana’s imprint Blackbird Books. Founded in August of 2015, this is ground-breaking move in the South African literary landscape, offering a pioneering framework for new South African narratives. Mahlape is a columnist for the Sowetan and focuses on issues that she and many other women face in South Africa. She is part of the Mail & Guardian Top 200 2017.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

Alistair McCleery

Alistair McCleery is Director of the Scottish Centre for the Book and Professor of Literature and Culture at Edinburgh Napier University. He is co-author of the two standard textbooks in his field, An Introduction to Book History (Routledge second edition 2012) and The Book History Reader (second edition, Routledge 2006). He has recently contributed the chapter on ‘Publishing’ to The Cambridge Companion to the History of the Book (CUP 2015) and co-authored ‘Publishing 1914-2000’ for The Cambridge History of the Book in Great Britain vol 7 (CUP 2017 forthcoming).

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

Peter D. McDonald

Peter D. McDonald is Professor of English and Related Literature at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of St Hugh’s College. He writes on literature, the modern state and the freedom of expression; the history of writing systems, cultural institutions and publishing; multilingualism, translation and interculturality; and on the limits of literary criticism. His main publications include British Literary Culture and Publishing Practice, 1888-1914 (CUP, 1997), The Literature Police: Apartheid Censorship and its Cultural Consequences (OUP, 2009), and Artefacts of Writing: Ideas of the State and Communities of Letters from Matthew Arnold to Xu Bing (OUP, 2017).

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 10am | Link for this entry

Khwezi Mkhize

Khwezi Mkhize is lecturer in the English Department at the University of Cape Town. He received his PhD from the Department of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania in 2015. He is currently working on a book manuscript based on his PhD thesis provisionally titled A Home-Made Empire: South Africa and the Imperium Before World War II.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Hlonipha Mokoena

Hlonipha Mokoena received her Ph.D. from the University of Cape Town in 2005. She is currently an associate professor and researcher at WiSER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research) at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. She recently published a book, titled Magema Fuze: The Making of a Kholwa Intellectual, which is about Magema Magwaza Fuze, the first Zulu-speaker to publish a book in the language.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Christopher Ouma

Christopher Ouma holds a Doctorate from the Department of African Literature at University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He is a senior lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Cape Town. His research and teaching interests include the broader field of contemporary African and African Diasporic literary and cultural production. He is interested in African popular culture, black print cultures particularly small magazines, literary journals and literary periodicals. He has held fellowships at the Open University, Milton Keynes London and University of the Johannesburg. He has co-edited The Spoken Word Project: Stories Travelling through Africa, and recently co-edited a special issue of The Black Scholar titled “After Madiba: Black Studies in South Africa.” He has published a number of books chapters as we as articles in Research in African Literatures, East African Literary and Cultural Studies, Matatu, Kunapipi amongst others. He is currently co-editor of the Journal Social Dynamics: A Journal of African Studies.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Jane Potter

Jane Potter is Reader in Publishing in the Oxford International Centre for Publishing, Oxford Brookes University.  Her publications include Boys in Khaki, Girls in Print: Women’s Literary Responses to the Great War, 1914-1918 (Oxford University Press, 2005), Wilfred Owen: An Illustrated Life (Bodleian Library Publishing, 2014), and, with Carol Acton, Working in a World of Hurt: Trauma and Resilience in the Narratives of Medical Personel in War Zones (Manchester University Press, 2015).  She is currently editing a new of The Selected Letters of Wilfred Owen for Oxford University Press and for Cambridge University Press, A Cambridge History of World War One Poetry.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Ranka Primorac

Ranka Primorac is a Lecturer at the University of Southampton. Among her book-length publications: The Place of Tears (2006), African City Textualities (ed, 2010). She is interested in the social functioning of literary narratives, new cosmopolitanisms, city texts and cultures and the world’s literary systems. Her current research focuses on Southern and south-east Africa.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Janet Remmington

Janet Remmington is a scholarly publisher, researcher, and writer. She is undertaking doctoral research on African intellectual mobilities, c1850–2010, at the University of York. She has published a number of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and is co-editor of a centennial volume on Sol Plaatje’s Native Life in South Africa (Wits University Press, 2016).

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Corinne Sandwith

Corinne Sandwith is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Pretoria. She is the author of World of Letters: Reading Communities and Cultural Debates in Early Apartheid South Africa (2014) and co-editor of Africa South: Viewpoints, 1958-1961. Her research interests include the history of reading, criticism, publishing and public debate in early apartheid South Africa with a particular focus on marginal print cultures and the dissident press.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry

Dr. Mass Tapfuma

Dr Mass Tapfuma trained as a librarian and worked for a Newspaper publisher, Southern Africa Printing and Publishing House. She joined Nust (National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo) in 2007 as a lecturer in Library and Information studies but transfered to the newly established Department of Publishing studies in 2009. She is also a postdoctoral fellow at the University of KwaZulu Natal, Information Studies department in the School of Social Science.

Edited on 06 Jul 2018 around 1pm | Link for this entry