Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa

Print Culture and Publishing in 20th Century South Africa

Print Cultures South Africa

Past Events

Print Culture and Publishing in Africa

13 Sep 2016

Oxford Brookes University

Print Culture and Publishing in Africa is a one-day colloquium taking place at Oxford Brookes University on Tuesday 13th September 2016 from 9.00am-6.00pm at Headington Hill Hall, Headington Hill Campus Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, OX3 0BT. It examines the publishing, dissemination and reception of the book and journal in Africa from a broad historical perspective.

Registration for the colloquium: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/print-culture-and-publishing-in-africa-one-day-colloquium-registration-26193732158. The colloquium is open to all, and generous funding from the British Academy has enabled us to offer a limited number of free places to attend this event.

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Print Culture and Colonisation in Africa

A Colloquium

May 2015

HUMA Seminar Room, Upper Campus, University of Cape Town, Cape Town

Jointly hosted by the University of Pretoria and the University of Cape Town in collaboration with Oxford Brookes University and with funding from the British Academy.

The flow of technology, missionaries and merchants brought printing to African countries. The development of print culture was dispersed and intensified by the advent of colonisation. This two-day colloquium focused on the interplay between colonial interventions and local textual cultures. Papers explored the ways in which books and the book trade have been shaped by Africa’s colonial and postcolonial history, and how print cultures developed across the continent in the context of wide‑‑scale European colonisation. They also considered the history of the book in the context of apartheid South Africa.

This event was organised by Dr Elizabeth Le Roux (Pretoria), Professor Archie Dick (Pretoria) and Professor Shamil Jeppie (UCT).

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Print, Reading, Book Culture and Debate in South Africa

Johannesburg Book Fair

26 Sep 2014

Jozi Book Fair, Central Johannesburg College, Ellis Park Campus.

Archie Dick (Print, text and book culture & Hidden History of South
Africa's Book and Reading Cultures); Corinne Sandwith (World of
letters: reading communities and cultural debates in early apartheid
South Africa) Moderator: Prof. Isabel Hofmeyr

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Print Networks in Africa

A One-Day Colloquium

04 Sep 2014

Oxford Brookes University

The colloquium ‘Print Networks in Africa’ aimed to contribute to a more informed understanding of national and transnational book and publishing networks and the nature of colonial and postcolonial print economies from the 19th century to the present day. It was funded by the British Academy as part of the International Partnership and Mobility scheme between Oxford Brookes University and the University of Pretoria.

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Pretoria in/im print

Textual and print cultures and text-as-image in the Capital City

08 May 2014

Faculty of Humanities, University of Pretoria

A one-day book history workshop hosted by the Faculty of Humanities, University of Pretoria, as part of the CAPITAL CITIES project. This followed on from the successful international conference on print, publishing and cultural production in South Africa hosted by the University of Pretoria in May 2013 and organised by Lize Kriel and Elizabeth Le Roux.

This conference ‘Pretoria in/im print: Textual and print cultures and text-as-image in the Capital City’ narrowed the focus to the role the city in which the university is situated, has played and currently plays in such production. This conference involved postgraduate students as well as established researchers in fields as diverse as written and printed culture, visual arts and culture, information design, editing and publishing, history, literature and new technologies are invited to submit abstracts. The following themes were addressed:

  • histories of the book trade, including publishers, mission presses, printers, and libraries
  • writing and reading (in) the city
  • text and/as image, e.g. on posters, pamphlets, postcards, or maps of Pretoria/Tshwane
  • inscriptions, on walls, billboards, stone, trees, hilltops, bodies, from tattoos to graffiti
  • the capital as an epistolary ‘hub’ for writing to and from Pretoria 
  • networks of production and consumption, local and transnational

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Seminars in Book History

University of Pretoria

06 May 2014

Jane Potter and Caroline Davis contributed to the ‘Seminars in Book History’ series, which was established by the French Institute of South Africa ( IFAS) and the Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria. The title of Jane Potter's paper was, 'The New Girl, Her Magazines, and the Second Anglo-Boer War' and the title of Caroline Davis's was, 'Erasing the Record: Longmans in South Africa 1910-1994'.

Progressing Book History and Publishing Studies as Disciplines

A British Academy Event

24 Oct 2012

The purpose of this event was to discuss and agree a set of objectives to enable us to further the progression of Publishing Studies as an established field of research and teaching. The day was structured as a forum during which all participants contributed ideas and objectives towards this goal.

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The Book in Africa

A Day Symposium

20 Oct 2012

Institute of English Studies, University of London

The aim of this event was to provide a forum for the discussion of new research and critical debates about print culture in Africa, and to bring together leading scholars in African literature with interests in literary and cultural history, publishing studies and the history of the book.  This symposium was organised as a collaborative event by: the Department of English at the Open University, the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies (OICPS) at Oxford Brookes University and the Institute of English Studies.

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